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What's up there?
#11
[BBB]Curse Wrote:Venus and Mercury will be huddling close together for the next couple of weeks
cos they are cold?
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#12
lol, yup, it's cold up there, oh wait.. venus is hot and so is mercury.
nice to see that someone read this thread <!-- sBig Grin --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_biggrin.gif" alt="Big Grin" title="Very Happy" /><!-- sBig Grin -->

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#13
every time it's updated m8
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#14
April 2010 The favorite constellations of the season spring into view in the early evening this month. Leo is well up in the east at nightfall, with Regulus, his bright heart, leading the way. A curved pat- tern known as the Sickle, which outlines the lion’s head and mane, is to the left of Regulus. Virgo is low in the sky at nightfall but quickly climbs to prominence, highlighted by Spica. A pair of planets puts on a good show in the west shortly after sunset. Brilliant Venus will remain in view throughout the month, with Mercury scooting close to it in the middle of the month.


April 1, 2010
Cor Caroli, the brightest star in Canes Venatici, is in the east as darkness falls, not far from the Big Dipper. The star's name means "the heart of Charles." Edmund Halley, the British astronomer royal, named it in honor of King Charles II.

April 2, 2010
Four of the five planets that are visible to the unaided eye are in sight at the same time early this evening. Venus, the "evening star," is low in the west at sunset, with fainter Mercury to its lower right. Orange Mars stands high in the south, with golden Saturn climbing skyward in the east.

April 3, 2010
The Big Dipper is high in the northeast this evening. It appears to "pour" its contents toward the northern horizon and into the Little Dipper. This fainter dipper is anchored by Polaris, the North Star, which is at the end of the dipper's handle.

April 4, 2010
Polaris, the North Star, anchors the northern sky. It also anchors the Little Dipper. At nightfall, the dipper stretches roughly parallel to the northern horizon, with Polaris at the tip of the handle and the bowl to its right.

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#15
April 5, 2010
The planets Venus and Mercury are low in the west as night begins to fall the next few evenings. Venus is the brilliant "evening star." Much fainter Mercury is just a little to the lower right of Venus.

April 6, 2010
The planet stands quite close to Venus, the brilliant "evening star," early tonight. They pop into view low in the west not long after sunset. Mercury is just to the lower right of Venus and looks like a fairly bright star.

April 7, 2010
Look for the planet Venus low in the west just after sunset. It's the brilliant "evening star." And it has a bright companion: the planet Mercury, which is just a bit to its right.

April 8, 2010
Sirius, the brightest star in the night sky, slides across the southwest this evening. The star is well up in the south-southwest as darkness falls, and sets by around midnight. It twinkles fiercely as it drops nearer the horizon.

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#16
April 9, 2010
The star Gamma Hydra marks the tail of Hydra, the water snake, which is the longest constellation in the sky. The star climbs into view in the southeast by around 10 p.m. and stands highest in the sky a few hours later.

April 10, 2010
The planet Jupiter rises below the Moon early tomorrow. It looks like a brilliant star. It's in the east about 45 minutes before sunrise, but it is so low that you need a clear horizon to see it.

April 11, 2010
Virgo is the second-largest constellation. It is so big that it takes about four hours for the whole constellation to clear the eastern horizon. Yet is contains only one bright star: blue-white Spica, which climbs into view around nightfall.

April 12, 2010
Three of the "stars" of spring are climbing higher into the evening sky. Around 10 p.m., look overhead for Regulus in Leo, the lion. Spica, in Virgo, is in the east-southeast, with yellow-orange Arcturus well to its left in Bootes, the herdsman.

April 13, 2010
Our stellar neighborhood is thinly settled. Only 11 stars lie within 10 light-years of the solar system, and only one of them is visible from northern skies: Sirius, the brightest star in the night sky, which is well up in the southwest in early evening.

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#17
[BBB]Curse Wrote:Our stellar neighborhood is thinly settled. Only 11 stars lie within 10 light-years of the solar system
that's the biggest problem with not living in the centre of town - it's just too far to travel when there's a party!
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#18
tell me about it, i got 2 mi / 3.5km walk to nearest shop, however, you get a nice view of the night sky out here

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#19
April 15, 2010
Venus, the "evening star," stands to the Moon's upper left at nightfall. The smaller planet Mercury, which is only a fraction as bright as Venus, is about a degree below the Moon, which is less than the width of a finger held at arm's length.

April 16, 2010
A thin crescent Moon is in the west at nightfall this evening. The planet Venus, the brilliant "evening star," stands directly below the Moon, and the planet Mercury is to the lower right of Venus. Mercury looks like a fairly bright star.

April 17, 2010
Corvus, the crow, is low in the southeast at nightfall and arcs across the southern sky during the night. Corvus's brightest stars form a small but distinct box. In mythology, the crow was a servant of the god Apollo.

April 18, 2010
The constellation Crater, the cup, dribbles across the south on spring nights. Eight stars outline the cup, but they are so faint that you need a fairly dark sky to see any of them. That is only because they are a great distance away, though.

April 19, 2010
Antlia, the air pump, scoots low across the southern sky this month. French astronomer Nicolas Lacaille named it during the 18th century. Antlia's brightest stars form a long, skinny triangle.

April 20, 2010
The Lyrid meteor shower is at its best the next couple of nights. The Moon will be out of the way for part of the night, providing dark skies for the few meteors that streak by.

April 21, 2010
Look for Mars near the Moon tonight. They are high in the sky at nightfall, with Mars a little above the Moon. The planet, which is only a bit more than half of Earth's diameter, looks like a bright orange star.

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#20
April 22, 2010
The Moon slides between the planets Mars and Saturn the next few nights. Tonight, Mars is to the upper right of the Moon at nightfall. It looks like a bright orange star. Golden Saturn is a good bit to the lower left of the Moon.

April 23, 2010
Orion, the hunter, is bowing out of the evening sky. He's low in the west at nightfall, and his stars begin dropping from view not long afterward. The constellation will be all but lost from sight by the middle of May.

April 24, 2010
The planet is to the lower left of the Moon as darkness falls tonight, and looks like a bright golden star. A small telescope will reveal the planet's glorious rings.

April 25, 2010
The planet Saturn, which looks like a bright golden star, is to the upper left of the Moon this evening. Spica, the brightest star of Virgo, is a little farther to the lower left of the Moon.

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