Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
What's up there?
#31
August 2010
An extraordinary show plays out in the west during early evening this month: an ever-changing configuration of the planets Venus, Mars, and Saturn. Mercury tries to join them, but it remains low in the twilight, and sets by the time night falls. The Summer Triangle — the stars Vega, Deneb, and Altair — highlights the eastern half of the sky. And on moonless nights, the glowing band of the Milky Way arches across the sky. The combination of stars and planets makes this a must-see month for skywatching.


August 8, 2010
Corona Borealis, the northern crown, a semicircle of seven stars, stands high in the west shortly after sunset. The constellation's leading light is Gemma. It is almost as bright as the North Star, so it is fairly easy to pick out.

August 9, 2010
One of the highlights of the summer sky is the Milky Way, which outlines the disk of our home galaxy. Under a dark sky, it arcs high across the east at nightfall, from W-shaped Cassiopeia in the north to teapot-shaped Sagittarius in the south.

August 10, 2010
During moonless August mornings, a ghostly pyramid of light sometimes rises from the eastern horizon. Called "zodiacal light," this pale glow is produced by sunlight reflecting off tiny dust grains in the plane of Earth's orbit around the Sun.

August 11, 2010
The Perseid meteor shower is building up to its peak tomorrow night. The Moon will be out of the way, so it won't interfere with the late-night fireworks.

August 12, 2010
Three planets line up above the Moon this evening. The brightest is Venus, the "evening star." Mars is just to its upper left, with Saturn a little farther to its upper right. Mars looks slightly orange, while Saturn is pale yellow.

August 13, 2010
The Moon and the planets Venus, Mars, and Saturn put on quite a show this evening. The planets align to the right of the Moon. They are fairly low in the sky at sunset, and they all drop from view by a couple of hours after sunset.

August 14, 2010
Spica, the brightest star of the constellation Virgo, stands to the right of the Moon this evening. Virgo is home to one of the largest galaxy clusters in the universe, but you need a telescope to any of the galaxies.

Signing of Curse
[Image: style7,CrZDC-pls--pls-.png]
[Image: signsignature376502.jpg]
Reply
Thanks given by:
#32
[BBB]Curse Wrote:August 2010
August 11, 2010
The Perseid meteor shower is building up to its peak tomorrow night. The Moon will be out of the way, so it won't interfere with the late-night fireworks.

August 12, 2010

now all we need in england is a lot less clouds than we've had recently or we'll have a job seeing the tops of the street lamps
Reply
Thanks given by:
#33
p.s.
when my kids were young, i used to let them stay up to see the Perseid and the Geminids. most years i couldn't keep them awake; couldn't wake them up; couldn't persuade them to get out of bed; it was pissing it down or couldn't even see the moon with all the clouds.
i even suggested taking them out onto belmont moors where it would be really dark but they were never that enthusiastic.

i used to be really into stars, nature, etc but my kids quickly fucked that up too.
Reply
Thanks given by:
#34
Marvin Wrote:i used to be really into stars, nature, etc but my kids quickly fucked that up too.

I promise to always use a condom. <!-- s8) --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_cool.gif" alt="8)" title="Cool" /><!-- s8) -->
Reply
Thanks given by:
#35
Zunhs Wrote:I promise to always use a condom. 8)
what's the fun in wearing a condom for a blowjob?
Reply
Thanks given by:
#36
Marvin Wrote:
Zunhs Wrote:I promise to always use a condom. <!-- s8) --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_cool.gif" alt="8)" title="Cool" /><!-- s8) -->
what's the fun in wearing a condom for a blowjob?

more fun than having the clap, and pissing razors afterwards.. and that's the least of what problems you might get practicing unsafe sex..

Signing of HepCat "Nobody tells anybody I'm anywhere, including me" - Colonel Flagg
Reply
Thanks given by:
#37
no one ever caught anything fatal from a bj.
yes, herpes isn't nice but it shouldn't slow anyone down.
p.s.
as for the clap, in my experience, the best, and certainly the fastest way, to get rid of any dose is to visit any clap clinic in Hong Kong, they don't fanny about with any of the crap drugs they just start off with all the best stuff.
Reply
Thanks given by:
#38
If everyone did that we would have lots of resistant little bugs.
Reply
Thanks given by:
#39
Zunhs Wrote:If everyone did that we would have lots of resistant little bugs.
already there m8.
in fact, been there, for some std's, since the 80's.
sadly, the only "real" safe sex is a wank.
still, at least that would be having sex with someone you truely loved, yeah, woody allen.
Reply
Thanks given by:
#40
August 15, 2010
The Moon passes by one of the scorpion's lost claws tonight: the star Zubenelgenubi. It is a little above the Moon as darkness falls. The name "Zubenelgenubi" means the "the southern claw."

August 16, 2010
Orion, the hunter, one of the signature star patterns of winter, is climbing into view in the early morning sky. Orion clears the eastern horizon a couple of hours before sunrise and is high in the sky at first light.

August 17, 2010
The Moon and Antares, the bright orange star that marks the heart of Scorpius, snuggle close together tonight. At their closest, they will be separated by less than the width of a finger held at arm's length.

August 18, 2010
The bright Moon is near the "spout" of the teapot formed by the brightest stars of Sagittarius tonight, surrounded by the Milky Way. But the Milky Way is so faint that it is tough to make out through the glare of the Moon.

August 19, 2010
Venus, the "evening star," is putting on quite a show this month. The planet pops into view in the western sky by 20 or 30 minutes after sunset. And as the sky darkens, it blazes like a beacon, drawing all eyes toward its dazzling beauty.

August 20, 2010
As darkness begins to fall, look quite low in the west for Venus, the bright "evening star." Much fainter Mars is a little to its upper right, with Saturn farther to the right. The star Spica is to the upper left of Venus.

August 21, 2010
The star Altair, whose name comes from the Arabic for eagle, is high overhead this evening. It is the brightest star in the constellation Aquila, the eagle. At a distance of 16 light-years, it is one of our closest stellar neighbors.

Signing of Curse
[Image: style7,CrZDC-pls--pls-.png]
[Image: signsignature376502.jpg]
Reply
Thanks given by:


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 2 Guest(s)